Qian Yongming

Ch'ien Yung-ming (1885-19 June 1958), financier, spent much of his career in the service of the Bank of Communications, of which he became chairman of the board of directors. After 1928 he held various economic posts in the National Government. He also rehabilitated the Chung-hsing Coal Mining Company, which became the second-largest colliery in China, […]

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Bai Chongxi

Pai Ch'ung-hsi (1893-2 December 1966), general of the Kwangsi clique, which also included Li Tsung-jen and Huang Shao-hung. In 1946-48 he was minister of national defense in the National Government. At the end of 1949 he went to Taiwan, where he became vice director of the strategic advisory commission in the presidential office. The second […]

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Zhang Fakui

Chang Fa-k'uei 張發奎 T. Hsiang-hua 向華 Chang Fa-k'uei (1896-), a leading Cantonese military officer, commanded the 12th (Ironside) Division, later and better known as the Fourth Army. Although a sometime supporter of Wang Ching-wei who participated in several anti- Chiang Kai-shek movements, he was given important commands during the Sino-Japanese war. A native of Shihhsing […]

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Zhang Qihuang

Chang Ch'i-huang 張其鍠 T. Tzu-wu 子武 H. Wu-ching chü-shih 無(無)竟居士 Chang Ch'i-huang (7 May 1877-30 June 1927), began his career as an official in Hunan and became an adviser and secretary general to Wu P'ei-fu during the 1920's. For five generations before his birth, Chang Ch'i-huang's family had produced scholarofficials in imperial China. He was […]

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Zhang Zhijiang

Chang Chih-chiang T. Tzu-min H. Tzu-chiang West. Paul C. C. Chiang Chang Chih-chiang (1882- ? ) was a military officer associated with Feng Yü-hsiang (q.v.) for many years prior to 1927. A native of Chihli (Hopei) province, Chang Chih-chiang was born into a landlord family in the Yenshan district. Since his father was the village […]

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Zhang Yilin

Chang I-lin 張一麐 T. Chung-jen Cheng-chiao H. Kung-fu Min-yung Ta-huan chu-shih Chang I-lin (1867-24 October 1943), government official, was a trusted secretary to Yuan Shih-k'ai for many years during the late Ch'ing and early republican periods. A native of Wuhsien, Kiangsu, Chang I-lin was born into a gentry-official family. His father, Chang Shih-i, was a […]

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Zhang Xueliang

Chang Hsueh-liang 張學良 T. Han-ch'ing 漢卿 Chang Hsueh-liang (1898-), known as the Young Marshal, was the son of Chang Tso-lin (q.v.), from whom he inherited control of Manchuria in 1928. In 1936, Chang Hsueh-liang detained Chiang Kai-shek at Sian in an attempt to persuade the National Government to form a united front with the Chinese […]

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Zhu De

Chu Teh 朱德 T. Yü-chieh 玉階 Chu Teh (18 December 1886-), commander in chief of the Chinese Communist forces for many years, became associated with Mao Tse-tung in 1928, when their forces combined to form the Fourth Red Army and to establish the central Communist base in Kiangsi. During the 1930's and early 1940's Chu […]

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Zhang Zuolin

Chang Tso-lin 張作霖 T. Yü-t'ing 雨亭 Chang Tso-lin (1873-June 1928), known as the Old Marshal, military leader who consolidated control of the Northeast. He began as the leader of a local army in Fengtien and rose to rule Manchuria as a virtually autonomous state from 1919 to his death. After 1924, Chang extended his control […]

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Sun Zhongshan

Sun Yat-sen 孫逸仙 Orig. Sun Wen 孫文 T. Ti-hsiang 帝象 H. Jih-hsin 日新 I-hsien 逸仙 Chung-shan 中山 Alias. Nakayama Sho (Chinese: Chungshan Ch'iao) 中山樵 Sun Yat-sen (12 November 1866-12 March 1925), leader of the republican revolution and of the Kuomintang. The village of Ts'uiheng (Choyhung) in Hsiangshan hsien, Kwangtung, situated near the coast some 30 […]

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