Bai Chongxi

Pai Ch'ung-hsi (1893-2 December 1966), general of the Kwangsi clique, which also included Li Tsung-jen and Huang Shao-hung. In 1946-48 he was minister of national defense in the National Government. At the end of 1949 he went to Taiwan, where he became vice director of the strategic advisory commission in the presidential office. The second […]

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Zou Lu

Tsou Lu (2 February 1884-13 February 1954), conservative Kuomintang leader who became chancellor of National Chung-shan University (1932-39) and leading authority on the 1911 revolution and the early history of the Kuomintang. A native of Tap'u, Kwangtung, Tsou Lu was born into a poor Hakka family. His father reportedly was a tailor and a peddler. […]

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Zhu Zhixin

Chu Chih-hsin (12 October 1885-21 September 1920), anti-Manchu revolutionary and protege of Sun Yat-sen, was active as a T'ung-meng-hui propagandist and as an organizer of anti- Manchu uprisings in Kwangtung. He later helped to organize resistance to Yuan Shih-k'ai. A leading figure in developing and popularizing Sun Yat-sen's political and social ideas, he founded the […]

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Zhu Qihua

Chu Ch'i-hua (28 December 1907-1945), a professional Communist agitator from 1921 to 1929, left the Chinese Communist party and began to write in the field of modern Chinese social history. He served (1938-41) under Hu Tsung-nan at the Sian training center for political workers. In 1941 he was arrested and imprisoned as a Communist spy; […]

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Zhang Jiluan

Chang Chi-luan 張季鸾 Orig. Chang Ch'ih-chang 張熾章 Chang Chi-luan (20 March 1888-6 September 1941), editor of the leading newspaper Ta Kung Pao, was a pioneer advocate of freedom in reporting and in expressing editorial opinion in the Chinese press. Although Chang Chi-luan was born in Tsoup'ing hsien, Shantung province, his family's ancestral home was in […]

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Zhang Fakui

Chang Fa-k'uei 張發奎 T. Hsiang-hua 向華 Chang Fa-k'uei (1896-), a leading Cantonese military officer, commanded the 12th (Ironside) Division, later and better known as the Fourth Army. Although a sometime supporter of Wang Ching-wei who participated in several anti- Chiang Kai-shek movements, he was given important commands during the Sino-Japanese war. A native of Shihhsing […]

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Zhang Renjie

Chang Jen-chieh 張人傑 T. Ching-chiang Chang Jen-chieh (19 September 1877-3 September 1950), businessman and goverment official, was an early supporter of Sun Yat-sen and a patron of Chiang Kai-shek. He was one of the "four elder statesmen of the Kuomintang" and served as governor of Chekiang province and as director of the National Reconstruction Commission […]

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Zhang Xueliang

Chang Hsueh-liang 張學良 T. Han-ch'ing 漢卿 Chang Hsueh-liang (1898-), known as the Young Marshal, was the son of Chang Tso-lin (q.v.), from whom he inherited control of Manchuria in 1928. In 1936, Chang Hsueh-liang detained Chiang Kai-shek at Sian in an attempt to persuade the National Government to form a united front with the Chinese […]

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Zhu Peide

Chu P'ei-te (29 October 1888-17 February 1937), Nationalist military officer. He was commander of the Third Army during the Northern Expedition in 1926-27 and governor of Kiangsi in 1927-29. Later, he served as chief of general staff, director general of military training, and director of the administrative office of the Military Affairs Commission. Yenhsing hsien, […]

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Bai Yunti

Buyantai Chinese. Pai Yun-t'i 白雲梯 Chinese T. Chü-ch'uan 巨川 Buyantai (17 February 1894-), Mongol leader, an official of the Kuomintang, known in Chinese as Pai Yun-t'i. He gained note for his attempts to promote the Kuomintang nationalities program in Inner Mongolia. A Mongol of the Center Kharchin Banner of the Josuto League, Buyantai was born […]

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